Data webpage for Roine & Waldenström Handbook chapter “Long-run trends in the distribution of income and wealth”

 

Reference: Roine, J., Waldenström, D. (2015). “Long-run trends in the distribution of income and wealth”, In: Atkinson, A.B., Bourguignon, F. (Eds.), Handbook of Income Distribution, vol. 2A, North-Holland, Amsterdam.

 

All variables and their sources are described in the Roine and Waldenström chapter.

Top income shares and their sources are also available at the World Income and Wealth Database.

 

1. Figures (Data in Excel and Stata format, Stata do code)

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Figure 1: Top 1% income share in 26 countries, 1870–2010

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Figure 2: Top1% across country groups.

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Figure 3: Trends in “next 9” percentiles in the top decile (P90–99), 26 countries

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Figure 4: Shares-within-shares in top incomes (P99–100/P90–100)

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Figure 5: Capital income share in total gross income, 1920–2010 (%)

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Figure 6: Capital gains in top income percentile, four countries

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Figure 7: Top income decile and the Gini coefficient

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Figure 8: Long run inequality trends using Gini and top income percentile share

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Figure 9: Wealth concentration in Australia, 1915–2010

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Figure 10: Wealth concentration in Denmark, 1908–1996

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Figure 11: Wealth concentration in Finland, 1908–2009

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Figure 12: Wealth concentration in France, 1900–2010

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Figure 13: Wealth concentration in the Netherlands, 1894–2011

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Figure 14: Wealth concentration in Norway, 1912–2011

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Figure 15: Wealth concentration in Sweden, 1908–2007

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Figure 16: Wealth concentration in Switzerland, 1913–1996

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Figure 17: Wealth concentration in the United Kingdom, 1911–2005

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Figure 18: Wealth concentration in the United States, 1916–2010

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Figure 19: Wealth concentration in ten countries, 1740–2011

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Figure 20: Wealth share of the “next four percentiles” (P95–99) in nine countries

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Figure 21: Shares-within-shares (P99–100/P90–100), nine countries, 1740–2011

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Figure 22: Wealth in top income and wealth fractiles in Sweden, 1908–2004

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Figure 23: Trends in top marginal tax rates, 1900–2006

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Figure 24: CEO and worker incomes in Sweden and the U.S., 1936–2011

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Figure 25: Relative wage in the financial sector vs. the top income percentile in the United States, 1909–2006

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2. Table (Data in Excel and Stata format, Stata do code)

Table name

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Table 6: Top 1% income share in 26 countries, 1870–2010

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Table A2: Top wealth percentile (P99–100) share of total private wealth in ten countries

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Table A3: Bottom four percentiles i top 5 wealth percentiles (P95–99) as share of total private wealth in nine countries

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Table A4: Top wealth decile (P90–100) as share of total private wealth in eight countries

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NEW: Updates and comments graciously offered by other researchers

·        (2014-11-10) Norway, wealth data: Edda Torsdatter Solbakken, Ph.D. student at Statistics Norway, notes that the 1868 observation relies on data (Mohn, 1873) that exclude cities. There was another publication from that same year which reported top wealthholder data in cities. Preliminary evidence suggests that this raises top 1% wealth share in Norway in 1868 by a lot, perhaps by fifty percent (from about 38 percent to about 54 percent). This suggests there was not so much equalization in Norway during the late 19th century and thus that Norway resembles the other Nordic countries more than previously thought.

·        (2014-10-22) The Netherlands, wealth data: Professor Bas van Bavel notes that pre-1993 and post-1993 distributional evidence is not fully comparable. He states that: “The pre-1993 data concern an ever lesser share of total wealth (from the 1960's only a third or even a quarter) and, moreover, a very specific share (above a high threshold).Top shares are, therefore, much smaller than suggested. Now, the graph suggests that present wealth inequality in the NL is lower than in the 1970s, and this is probably incorrect.”

 

 

If any of the data files or Stata programs are missing or dysfunctional, please contact Daniel Waldenström.